Art Meets Science and Loneliness

A special visual sociology from the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA), Sydney.  We start with the Energies exhibition and then explore the nature of loneliness in modern life. We end with our return to Canberra’s art precinct.

Energies: Haines & Hinterding

Below is ‘Encounter with the Halo Field,’ by David Haines and Joyce Hinterding.  These Australian artists live and work in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales. They blend experimental and traditional media to investigate energetic forces as well as the intersection of hallucination and the environment. 23 August 2015

Science meets art in this recording of the radio frequencies of nature New South Wales. Energies, David Haines and Joyce Hinterding. 23 August

Modern life

Now we move to other artworks also on exhibit at the MCA, illuminating Aussie sububia. “Day in Day Out,” Aleks Danko. 23 August

Self portrait on loneliness, By the Sea, by Todd McMillan. Inspired by Monk by the Sea (1809). 23 August

Nike Savvas, Showtime. He’s a Sydney artist.

Now for some Sydney art with sociological themes of the body, youth culture and space. Storm Sequence, Shaun Gladwell. 23 August

Back to Canberra

Outside of the National Gallery of Australia, you can see the beautiful water fountains low on the ground, as well as the famous sphere gravitating high in the air. It’s called, ‘Diamonds‘ (2002) by Aotearoa New Zealand-born artist Neil Dawson. Commissioned by the Gallery in 2002, it’s made with aluminium and mesh, painted with synthetic polymer automotive paints, and suspended by stainless steel fittings and cables.

Diamonds, by Neil Dawson. Outside the National Gallery of Australia.

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