This koala lives out the nation’s siesta dreams like a champ.


[Photo: a koala is slumped over in a sitting position on a tree branch, with its front paws stretched out to steady itself. Also it is adorable.]

Source: The Other Sociologist

Wendy Saddington: underground icon

This exhibition at the

Canberra Museum and Gallery contains memorabilia collected by Canberra artist Peter Maloney of the Australian singer heralded as “The Face of 68” at the age of 18. She performed with many influential art rock groups in the 1970s. She eventually travelled to New York where she went on to join the International Society for Krishna Consciousness and adopted the name Gandharvika Devi Dasi and continued to perform under her Anglo name but shunned the music press. 

She died in Melbourne “after a life full of creative combustion on the shortest day of the year – the winter solstice, 22 June 2013." 

What a fascinating woman. 

Source: The Other Sociologist.

Sydney artist William Yang totally gets Canberra: “Canberra’s a difficult place to photograph – it’s small, it’s conservative and the people aren’t showy like they are in Sydney. But it does have beautiful environs. When you’re driving around and you come across a big flock of cockatoos. Now that’s exciting." 

Photo: Other Sociologist.

Film Review: Felices 140 (Happy 140)

Part of the Spanish Film Festival, Felices 140 (Happy 140) stars Mirabel Verdu as Elia, a woman throwing herself an elaborate 40th birthday party in a remote villa. She invites her sister’s family and her lifelong friends as well as an old lover, who shows up in a helicopter with a self-centred and vain girlfriend half his age. This consistently amusing film takes a twisted turn, after Elia reveals she’s won €140 million.

Envy and resentment bubbling below the surface rises quickly as a moral crisis threatens Elia’s happiness. Interestingly, Elia’s grand romantic gesture to sweep her old flame off his feet is an unfamiliar twist on usual romantic comedy fodder.

Audiences are invited to champion this type of behaviour in men, even as the betrothed woman love interest protests (inevitably, she always relents, teaching heterosexual male audiences that all women can, and should be, be conquered even against her will). Not so for a woman protagonist, for whom this type of masculine behaviour invites from audiences frustration and a sense of danger.

The film goes in an unexpected direction, as Spanish films always do, leaving the audience pensive and sympathetic for the tragedy and greed that unfolds. Definitely watch it.