Inclusion and Intersectionality in Science

Image description: in the background, people stand in a lecture theatre, but their details cannot be seen as the image has been blurred so the text above can be read.

Today I’m speaking at the Science Pathways conference. I’m publishing a description of my slides here for accessibility for conference delegates, and for anyone else watching at home.

Remember to register to watch the live stream for free! I’m on from 1pm-2.30pm AEST.

Slide 1: Making Science Inclusive

Dr Zuleyka Zevallos
@OtherSociology
OtherSociologist.com

[Image description: in the background, people stand in a lecture theatre, but their details cannot be seen as the image has been blurred so the text above can be read.]

Slide 2: Inclusion

  • An Aboriginal woman in a white lab coat, staring out the window of an officeInclusion: actively seeking out, valuing & respecting differences
  • Diversity: how differences are defined, supported & sustained
  • Equity: barriers, issues & solutions
  • Access: opportunities to enhance participation
  • Intersectionality: gender & racial inequalities are interconnected, impacting other structural disadvantages

[Image description: the text above is on the left-hand-side. On the right is a photo of an Aboriginal woman in a white lab coat, staring out the window of an office]

Slide 3: Reactions against intersectionality

  • Photo depicting a classroom. A White man sits at the front with his back to the viewer. Five people of various racial backgrounds can be seen smiling, sitting opposite the White man, appearing to be his students“We can’t move everything around for one person”
  • “Let’s wait until we have this gender problem fixed”
  • “But we have a reconciliation action plan”

[Image description: text above is on the left-hand-side. On the right is a photo depicting a classroom. A White man sits at the front with his back to the viewer. Five people of various racial backgrounds can be seen smiling, sitting opposite the White man, appearing to be his students]

Slide 4: Best practice

  • A White disabled woman sitting in her wheelchair. She has her face turned backward and to the side, smiling at someone outside the shot. Her communication device is in front of her, which includes a large keyboardData collection informing policy & practice
  • Accountability measures (quotas, task-force)
  • Proactive leadership
  • Ongoing reflection & change

[Image description: text above is on the left. On the right is a photo of a White disabled woman sitting in her wheelchair. She has her face turned backward and to the side, smiling at someone outside the shot. Her communication device is in front of her, which includes a large keyboard]

Slide 5: Questions for us

  • A woman of colour is sitting, her body is forward and attentive. She rests her chin on her hand and appears to be concentratingWhat programs and training are available on inclusion?
  • What does our team do to make sure differences are respected on a day-to-day basis?
  • What type of push back might I find on using intersectionality?
  • How many people from a different racial background are in a position of leadership?
  • How would I know if there is a gap between policy & practice?
  • How many Indigenous scientists do I cite?
  • What does it take to make sure LGBTQIA initiatives are welcoming of disabled / racial/ religious minorities?
  • When was the last time I had my lab assessed to make sure it was accessible?
  • When was the last time I gave up a science opportunity for a minority person?

[Image description: on the left is the text above. On the right is a photo of a woman of colour sitting, her body is forward and attentive. She rests her chin on her hand and appears to be concentrating.]

Watch the video of my talk (from 1:57 minutes), followed by the panel discussion (1:13:20).

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