Latin Summer Festival

The three biggest group of Latins in Australia are Brazil-born (47,500 Australians). Brazilians are the fastest growing Latin groups. Since the 1980s, Chileans had made up the biggest group of Latin people (24,900 people); followed by those born in El Salvador (over 9,600 people). Most Latin Americans live in New South Wales (especially those from Brazil and Chile), but Victoria is home to the second-largest Latin communities.

Source: My Instagram http://ift.tt/14DJjAM

On the 17th of November, Chile voted in the national election. Michelle Bachelet has won twice as many votes as her major opponent (47% of votes) but this may not be enough for a win.

In this great feature,Al Jazeera English explore the importance of student activist movement on the election. Students protested for free education and improvement of services. Bachelet was popular amongst low income and among younger voters, but not everyone was convinced that social change can happen.

Chileans in Australia: The Other 9/11 and the Legacy of the Pinochet Regime

Steet art portrait  of Salvador Allende. Via Thierry Ehrmann, Flickr
Steet art portrait of Salvador Allende. Via Thierry Ehrmann, Flickr

By Zuleyka Zevallos, PhD

Today is the “Other September 11.” On this day in Chile, 1973, President Salvador Allende was killed in a coup by Augusto Pinochet. My blog post explores the ongoing impact of this event on Chileans living in Australia.

In his historic speech, Allende’s final address to the nation, he talks of his sacrifice against imperial forces and his vision for the future. SBS News has a great website commemorating this event, including the role that the Australian Government played in feeding intelligence to the USA, which eventually led to the rise of the Pinochet regime. When the Australian Labor government came to power in 1972, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam is said to have been appalled about Australia’s involvement in the coup and removed his Government’s political support.

Australia began accepting Chilean refugees in the mid-1970s. The Chilean-Australian community grew from 6,000 in 1971 to over 24,000 by 1991. Continue reading Chileans in Australia: The Other 9/11 and the Legacy of the Pinochet Regime

thesociologist:

Along the lines of the 99% movement (which inspired his earlier ‘Seating for the One Percent’ project), Sebastian Errazuriz adds his own contribution to New York’s street lines. The Chile-born artist and designer transforms lines into dollar signs by painting a white letter ‘S’ across each line.

Read more: http://popupcity.net/2012/06/wall-street-streets/#ixzz1zbhDxp4J

(via urbanfunscape)