In her historic maiden speech, Senator Malarndirri McCarthy, Yanyuwa woman and Member of the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly, addresses Indigenous resilience, support for migrants and refugees, and solidarity with LGBTQIA Australians.

“I urge parliamentarians in both houses to understand this: the Yanyuwa are a people whose struggle for recognition took nearly 40 years. So many elders died well before such recognition and, most importantly, before any respect took place. Such long, drawn out legal battles have wearied many families of first nation peoples, constantly trying to defend their sense of self and identity and country. Maybe that was the intention – to battle fatigue. But we’re still here, and we’re not going to go away.”

Source: ABC.

Publication: Better Leadership through Diversity

Excerpt from my latest for The Humanist:

In failing to take responsibility for diversity in a methodical and transparent manner, the March for Science leadership made four major errors. First, the organizers attempted to set up the march as “apolitical” without having thought about equity, inclusion, and accessibility. The organizers failed to connect with diversity experts and activist groups.

Second, the march organizers did not proactively manage the anti-diversity discourse that their supporters engaged in.

Third, the march used an ineffective communications strategy that exacerbated poor diversity practices.

Fourth, the organization was not welcoming of diversity. Several women publicly left over dysfunctional dynamics and lack of support for diversity.

In short, rather than learning from similar problems of exclusion that emerged from the Women’s March, the March for Science replicated them, particularly by marginalizing people of color and community activists.

The best way to redress the inequities in science is through structural reform. This means reviewing policy through an evidence-based process. A more productive approach to diversity focuses on responsibilities of leaders to enhance measurable results. In other words, for science to make the most of everyone’s talents, leaders must “walk the talk,” modelling best practice and promoting accountability for themselves and other managers.

Read more on The Humanist: https://thehumanist.com/commentary/better-leadership-diversity-case-study-march-science

Better Leadership through Diversity: A Case Study of the March for Science – TheHumanist.com

My latest on The Humanist discusses the leadership lessons from the March for Science for the humanist movement, on equity, inclusion and accessibility.

The best way to redress the inequities in science is through structural reform. This means reviewing policy through an evidence-based process. A more productive approach to diversity focuses on responsibilities of leaders to enhance measurable results. In other words, for science to make the most of everyone’s talents, leaders must “walk the talk,” modelling best practice and promoting accountability for themselves and other managers.

A vision for social change that eliminates existing inequalities must incorporate the leadership, professional expertise, and lived experiences of minorities from diverse backgrounds. Without decision-making power to shape the strategy and planning of any event, program, or organization, minorities remain on the margins. Subsequently, lacking the active representation of humanity, the full benefits of science and social justice endeavors will be limited in influence and impact.

Read more on The Humanist.

Better Leadership through Diversity: A Case Study of the March for Science – TheHumanist.com

Diversity can only add value when leaders take seriously the responsibility of equity, inclusion and accessibility.

Read more: The March for Science Can’t Figure Out How to Handle Diversity.

[Image: people marching through a park, one sign reads: Dissent is patriotic.]

Want to be a jet-setting leader? A social science degree will get you there! A British Council study shows that 44%of leaders surveyed had a degree in social science, and 46% also had studied or worked overseas. The Council Director says: 

“Our research shows a clear need for leaders who have critical analytical and interpretive skills as well as professional knowledge, leaders who can make decisions based on understanding of cultural context and human insight, and leaders who are international in their outlook and, increasingly, in their learning experience.”

Image: Social Science Insights. Quote: British Council.

“If your success is defined as being well adjusted to injustice and well adapted to indifference then we don’t want…

“If your success is defined as being well adjusted to injustice and well adapted to indifference then we don’t want successful leaders. We want great leaders – who love the people enough and respect the people enough to be unsought, unbound, unafraid and unintimidated to tell the truth.” —Dr Cornel West, philosopher.

#philosophy #socialscience #sociology #quote #leadership #cornelwest

Welcome to STEM Daisies

stemdaisies:

Overview

Greetings, I am a leader of a Girl Scouts Daisies troop (kindergarten and 1st grade) in South Arlington, VA. We have fifteen 5- and 6-year-old girls who are interested in learning science, technology, engineering, and math. 

How it Works

1) Women in science, technology, engineering, math: Please make a short film (~3 minutes) of yourself – share your experience with your career, in words that a 1st grader would understand. 

2) Post to your choice of social media with hashtag #STEMDaisies so we can find it (tweet me at @monicadear).

3) Invite another woman in STEM to do the same.

All responses are on this blog: 
http://stemdaisies.tumblr.com/post/101091516629/videos-weve-received

image

Why?

I’d like to

A) normalize the process of asking a question, formulating a hypothesis, researching and collecting data, analyzing results, and reporting on findings.

B) expand our girls’ notions of what jobs are available to them, and what kinds of amazing science is available for them to learn.

C) connect with other women and learn/share stories.

Prompts

If you need some ideas about what to put in your video:

– Why is your field important? Why should we care about what you do?

– What is your typical day like? Please give us a glimpse of your tools, office, instruments, lab, or facility.

– How did you get involved with your work? (mention your field of study, interest as a child, hobbies, or extracurricular activities)

Thank you for sharing your knowledge with the next generation!

Sincerely,

Monica S. Flores

October 21, 2014

Nelson Mandela’s ProSocial Moral Disobedience

By Zuleyka Zevallos, PhD

In honour of Nelson Mandela’s life, I thought it would be useful to take a critical look at the sociology of Mandela’s leadership. As the world mourns the death and humanity of Mandela, let’s also reflect on the social bases of Mandela’s courage and strength. This is as an opportunity to better understand how Mandela’s social experiences inspired his search for social justice.

In their excellent study, Davide Morsellia and Stefano Passini draw on social psychology and sociology in order to compare the social and political influences on three world leaders of civil rights movements in three different societies: Nelson Mandela in South Africa, Mahatma Gandhi in India and Martin Luther King Jr in America. The researchers argue that these three world leaders engaged in “prosocial moral disobedience” – that is, they actively went against authority despite the personal persecution that followed. They did so not simply due to personal qualities, but as a direct result of their socialisation. Mandela will always be remembered as an extraordinary individual, as will Gandhi and MLK. This post will show that this is not the way these leaders understood their lives and activism. My post will explore how Mandela’s moral development and personal attitudes were affected by social context. Continue reading Nelson Mandela’s ProSocial Moral Disobedience

#Sociology of #Work: #Research by Australian Sociologist Barbara Pocock shows how #management can improve work/life balance. This includes being flexible with hours and the structure of #work, the type of work different employees do, and the ways that employees can deliver work outputs. With new #technology, there are a range of cloud based solutions for collaboration and submission of work. Another important way of managing work/life balance is to foster an environment of #trust where employees can let you know about their out-of-hours responsibilities and preferences should they wish to have you better accommodate their needs. Managers should also seek to support working #parents and #workers who provide care for dependants who are sick, elderly or disabled. This includes access to affordable childcare, good parental and care leave arrangements that won’t impact on career progression, and giving employees the capacity to take holidays and other time off to manage family and health appointments. Society talks about work/ life balance as an issue that individuals and families should negotiate on their own. Pocock puts emphasis on “Supportive workplace cultures, practices and #leadership” as the means to improve work. Making work/ life balance a responsibility of workplaces as well as employees is a pivotal way that managers & CEOs can ensure that work is fulfilling, meaningful and energising, rather than a drain on the #creativity and #productivity of their #company. Pocock’s latest research is found in “Time Bomb: Work, Rest and Play in Australia Today.” #socialscience #worklifebalance #business #management #humanresources #corporate #training #life #career #visualsociology