“I Have as Much Right to be Here”: Women of Colour in Space

A Black child in an astronaut Halloween costume holds a sign that read 'I have as much to read here.' At the bottom is the title of this post: Women of colour in space

I wrote this post below for STEM Women on G+ about the MAKERS documentary focused on women in the American space program. I wanted to add some notes about two women of colour featured in the program.

Latina Engineer Marleen Martinez wanted to be an astronaut from the age of five. She writes the scripts and procedures to test the Orion spacecraft. She is the daughter of migrant farmers and says she overcame a lack of role models to reach her goal:

“I do remember that engineer wasn’t really a girls’ field. There was other things you could do. When people found out I was becoming an engineer, a lot of people were taken aback. Especially being a Hispanic female, it’s not something that you really run into very often, it’s actually very rare.”

Physician and peace-corps worker, Dr Mae Jameson was also featured. She is celebrated as the first Black woman in space, a title she says frustrates her:

“I was really irritated that I was the first African-American woman in space, or the first woman of colour in space in the world. I was irritated because there should have been many more before me…  One of these things that people talk about nowadays is the overview effect [astronaut’s overwhelming experience of seeing the Earth from orbit, as a ‘pale blue dot’ without national boundaries]. But that wasn’t the part that struck me. The perspective that stuck with me is that I am as much a part of this universe as any speck of stardust. I have as much right to be here. It connected me with this greater universe. That perspective of belonging was what was important to me. “

Continue reading “I Have as Much Right to be Here”: Women of Colour in Space

Megan Smith: STEM Woman in the White House

You may have heard that Megan Smith former Vice President of GoogleX is now the Chief Technology Officer for The White House. Smith has both a Bachelor and a Masters degree in Mechanical Engineering from MIT, she serves on the MIT Board, and she is also a successful entrepreneur. She has an outstanding commitment to gender diversity and she is one of the few big-name leaders in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) who is visible in her work with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) communities. Smith was formerly the CEO of PlanetOut, an online LGBT organisation. Let’s take a look at Smith’s amazing credentials and her work on women in STEM and LGBTQ advocacy.

The Tech industry needs us badly. - Megan Smith
The diversity of all of the millions of us, the technical women, the computer science women, is broad. This industry and this planet needs us badly. – Megan Smith, Chief Technology Officer, USA

Continue reading Megan Smith: STEM Woman in the White House

Trailblazing Latina in Science

Trailblazing Latina in Science

Today I co-hosted a STEM Women on G+ Hangout on Air. We spoke with engineer Candy Torres who gained a degree in astrophysics in the 1970s, when she was only one of seven women in her classes. Candy spoke about the challenges of following her career in science, which included gender exclusion and not having any women colleagues to support her education. Candy talked about how, even though her Puerto-Rican parents supported her love of science, they were also at a loss as to how to directly guide her. This is where being based at an all-woman university helped transform her love of science into a career.

While Candy attended most of her science courses at Rutgers University in the USA, she was based at Douglass College, which is a woman’s college with a strong history in Liberal Arts and Humanities (their current dean, Jacquelyn Litt, is a sociologist!). Candy’s career counsellors did not know much about the specifics of her science degree, but they provided social and educational support at a time when family circumstances led to Candy contemplate the need to drop out of university. With their encouragement, Candy persevered, and to this day, she sees that women-only learning spaces play an important role in women’ education.

Candy also discussed how learning science at a time when women were a minority was even more tricky because of her Latin background. (Understanding the impact of several bases of social inequality along race, gender, sexuality, class, disability and other issues is known as intersectionality theory in sociology.) Candy noted that the competitive science environment was the antithesis of the Latin culture she grew up with, which was more community-centred and focused on mutual support. Candy reflected on how this community spirit can also make it difficult for Latin women who want to study science, as migrant families would prefer to have their children close to home. This is why Candy advocates that educators work on a more collaborative approach with parents and communities to better support the inclusion of Latino and minority youth in science. Helping parents and communities see the various applied (practical) uses of a higher education degree is key. For example, promoting how science provides transferable skills in problem-solving, and how this knowledge can be put to use in new and innovative areas. 

We talked about how important networks are to building a successful career in science. Candy recommends that students get talking about their passion to teachers and to use their social networks to let people know they are looking for mentors or for work in science. This is how Candy got her first job as a software engineer at Princeton University, and later in NASA – her professor remembered her enthusiasm for science and offered to act as a referee for a job. 

You can watch our chat on YouTube – make sure you subscribe to our youtube channel (https://www.youtube.com/stemwomen) if you have a broad interest in supporting women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). And note that we’ve already spoken to three social scientists from anthropology, behavioural science and education, as well as other amazing women scientists!

#sociology   #stem   #stemwomen   #engineering   #appliedscience   #socialscience  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBSOi8QFL4I//cdn.embedly.com/widgets/platform.js

Training Women Engineers at Google

This morning, I co-hosted a STEM Women event along with Dr Buddhini Samarasinghe. We spoke with two women who work on Google’s IT Residency Program. We asked them about how women can get involved with this program and how it helps them manage working in a male-dominated field. Erin manages the program which runs across several cities (including Sydney). They recruit new graduates like Sam, who spoke with us about her experience transitioning from studying computer science and working at the IT helpdesk in her university, to training on the program, and then getting a permanent role at Google as an engineer.

It was especially interesting to hear that Google recruits people who have strong social skills and training in other fields, rather than simply just for their technical speciality. For example Erin also had a language background (Spanish) as part of her degree and she gave a couple of examples of people hired from the social sciences (psych and neuropsychology). I enjoyed hearing Sam talk about the applied science aspects of her job. Specifically, how working on software engineering projects as part of the program took her in new directions that she would not have otherwise have thought of while studying.

Training Women Engineers at Google

Training Women Engineers at Google

This morning, I co-hosted a STEM Women on G+ event along with Dr Buddhini Samarasinghe. We spoke with two women who work on Google’s IT Residency Program. We asked them about how women can get involved with this program and how it helps them manage working in a male-dominated field. Erin Leverton manages the program which runs across several cities (including Sydney). They recruit new graduates like Samantha Schaevitz who spoke with us about her experience transitioning from studying computer science and working at the IT helpdesk in her university, to training on the program, and then getting a permanent role at Google as an engineer. 

It was especially interesting to hear that Google recruits people who have strong social skills and training in other fields, rather than simply just for their technical speciality. For example Erin also had a language background (Spanish) as part of her degree and she gave a couple of examples of people hired from the social sciences (psych and neuropsychology). I enjoyed hearing Sam talk about the applied science aspects of her job. Specifically, how working on software engineering projects as part of the program took her in new directions that she would not have otherwise have thought of while studying.

Watch our chat on the video below and look out for a write up on the STEM Women blog! http://stemwomen.net

#stemwomen   #womeninstem   #womenengineers   #engineering   #sociology   #women   #stem   #career   #students   #google  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YjGFleJjzc&feature=share//cdn.embedly.com/widgets/platform.js

Women in Robotics

On Monday the 28th of April at 730am Aussie time (Sunday 27th 230pm USA Pacific) I’ll be co-hosting this discussion with Buddhini Samarasinghe for STEM Women on G+.

Join us for a STEM Women HOA as we speak to Annika O’Brien  on her career as a roboticist. Annika is an engineer who works on robotics and also a passionate STEM educator, teaching kids how to program and build robots through STEAMtrax. She will talk to us about her exciting career path as a woman in STEM, what inspires her, and why supporting women in STEM is important. 

A write up of the video is on the STEM Women website.

Inclusive Management in Tech

Here’s our STEM Women on G+ Hangout with Google+’s Chief Architect, Yonatan Zunger, co-hosted by Buddhini Samarasinghe and me. We had limited time and we could have easily spoken longer. I was especially interested to hear Yonatan speak about his personal journey to learn additional leadership skills to support diversity, such as active listening.

I see that many individuals are invested in supporting women in STEM, which is heartening, but this often means taking a personal interest to read more on the issue, as Yonatan has done. My interest as a sociologist is how to improve these individual efforts to build a critical mass. How do we better maximise and pool our collective efforts to achieve broader change?

I’m a big advocate of mandatory equity and diversity training within organisations. I also see that issues of inequality for women and other minorities need to move into a central place within all the STEM fields. These matters need to be addressed earlier in research and applied careers, so that they are not marginal topics that we debate later. Instead, the conversation we’re having with STEM Women is: things are unequal, what are we going to do about it?

 

Continue reading Inclusive Management in Tech

I Joined the Team at STEM Women

A couple of weeks ago, I joined the STEM Women management team. We are a not-for-profit run by three women of colour: Professor Rajini Rao, Dr Buddhini Samarasinghe and myself. Our goal is to improve the visibility and participation of women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). We have a number of exciting initiatives coming up, including a series of fortnightly Google+ Hangouts (broadcast on our YouTube), hosted by Buddhini and myself (with Rajini behind the scenes). This includes Hangouts with women talking about their careers in STEM; discussions with organisations about practical programs that address women’s inclusion; analysis of topical issues impeding progress and how to move forward; as well as conversations with men about how they can help support women and how we can address gender inequality together.

Earlier today Dr Buddhini Samarasinghe and I co-hosted the first of our new fortnightly interview series, and Rajini womaned our social media live. We chatted with Professor Jonathan Eisen, an evolutionary biologist specialising in microbiome research and editor-in-chief of the open-access journal PLoS Biology. Jonathan was a fantastic guest who spoke candidly about the need for male academics to be more proactive in addressing inequality. He gave some practical examples of how women’s participation in science can be bolstered by simple measures, such as by: offering childcare as part of academic conference services; through diversity training for hiring panels; and providing better mentorship for young women in science. Continue reading I Joined the Team at STEM Women

Woman Entrepreneur in Tech

Product designer Anne Katherine Halsall provides an interesting perspective on what it’s like being a woman entrepreneur in the technology sector at different career stages. She says when she was younger and worked at Google, she was flattered to receive compliments on being a good woman programmer. As she started doing more serious coding (” learning how to learn to program”) she realised her previous attitude was a problem. Continue reading Woman Entrepreneur in Tech

The Confines of Western Feminism

Hispanic women are fully aware that our culture is entrenched in misogyny, but not necessarily any less than American culture. Women in the United States are often expected to take their husbands’ last name. Many men still go to their bride’s father to ask for her hand in marriage; just because we see it as a sweet gesture it does not mean that it isn’t patriarchal in nature… Loving tradition and having pride in your culture does not mean these women cannot vocalize the gender issues of their communities. My mother’s feminism was the truest form of feminism for me; a belief in the potential upward mobility of all women.

Patricia Valoy, Civil Engineer, feminist blogger, and radio host reflects on gender politics and the sacrifices her stay-at-home mother made for her children after they migrated from the Dominican Republic to the USA. Valoy writes that Western feminism encouraged her to see her mother as being trapped in patriarchy, but she argues that we need to find a way to move past narrow conceptions of feminism:

Feminism cannot continue to exist as a monolithic block, or we will never be able to include women from all walks of life.

Via Everyday Feminism.