Is our table fancy enough? Probably not! This is a recreation of the Corsini family table from the 1850s. This setting includes China plates and many French elements. They hired a French chef to provide them with seven course meals including multiple soups, seafood, chicken, lamb cutlets, fowl, ham and dessert. The opulence of such a meal is jarring, and highlights social inequalities of the day that continue in the present.

Photo: The Other Sociologist.

Sociology of Hotel Art Wellington, New Zealand – this is pretty good. New Zealand putting Australia to shame with relatively nice art. Australia has some shockers – as documented in my hashtag.

Source: The Other Sociologist.

I visited beautiful Wellington, New Zealand in late September, to give a keynote talk at the Royal Society on gender equity and diversity. I then joined a distinguished panel to talk about the differences in national approaches to diversity in Australia and New Zealand, inclusion of Indigenous and other minority researchers, and intersectionality.

Video: The Other Sociologist.

At the Corsini Collection: A Window on Renaissance, at the Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki. The Corsini family settled in Florence in tge 13th Century and had a stranglehold of power in banking, trade and Government. They had ties to the strongest families in Florence, the Medici (there’s an excellent social network analysis article that documents how families used their social ties to maintain influence). The Corsini also had strong religious capital, with tge cardinals, one Pope and one saint in the family. The latter is seen at the end here – Saint Andrea Corsini. There are two bullet wounds in the painting, which was painted in 1630, and hidden behind a safe wall in 1944. A soldier shot through the wall, noticing fresh plaster.

Source: The Other Sociologist.

Being Chinese in Aotearoa: A Photographic Journey. This is a stunning and informative history of migration. It documents difficulties and triumphs in the face of ongoing racism. Highly recommend visiting if you’re in New Zealand Aotearoa. On the left you can see Appo Hocton (Ah Poo Hoc Ting), who arrived in his 20s, in 1842, to become the first documented Chinese-New Zealander.

: The Other Sociologist.

Most of my trip in New Zealand was spent at the University of Auckland. I gave a talk on intersectionality and the March for Science as well as attending various meetings providing advice and listening to progress and thinking on inclusion in science. The campus is stunning. This is the inside of the Clock Tower, an impressive tall, white building with beautiful architecture.

Photo: The Other Sociologist.